ReadWrite: Tech Genius Doesn't Need To Be White, Male And Wearing A Hoodie

 Read Write: YesWeCode

When you picture a successful tech CEO, what comes to mind? Probably a white man, maybe one wearing a hoodie. 

Technology is a caucasian male-dominated industry, that's why getting more diversity in tech has never been more of a priority. In fact, in the last month, a handful of the most well-known tech companies have released data that illustrates this trend, with male employees far outnumbering females, and in the U.S., a white majority rules.

Though these numbers clearly show there’s not enough diversity in the tech workforce, part of the imbalance stems from a lack of diversity in technology education at a young age—many students are unable to access resources that can set them up for a career path in tech.

In 2013, of the 30,000 students that took U.S. high school Advanced Placement computer science exam, less than 20 percent were female, eight percent were Hispanic, and three percent were black. No female, black or Hispanic students took the exam in Mississippi or Montana.

The poorest communities, often the most diverse, have the most limited access to technology. According to a Pew Internet study, just three percent of teachers of the poorest classrooms feel that their students have access to the digital tools they need at home.

#YesWeCode, an ambitious initiative to encourage 100,000 minority and low-income students to learn skills in technology, aims to change that, and provide a resource for students, parents and teachers to find out how best to teach the next generation of entrepreneurs, builders, and makers.

Officially launching July 4 at the Essence Festival in New Orleans, the largest festival celebrating African-American culture and music in the U.S., #YesWeCode will host a hackathon and a “technology village,” making technology a central part of the event for the first time ever.

Prince is headlining the event this year, and the music megastar was partially responsible for the creation of #YesWeCode.

“#YesWeCode came out of a conversation I was having with Prince about Trayvon Martin,” Van Jones, president of Rebuild The Dream Innovation Fund and one of the creators of #YesWeCode, told me in an interview. Martin, a teenager, was shot in a Florida neighborhood in 2012. “Prince said, ‘When an African-American kid is wearing a hoodie, people think he’s a thug, but when a white kid is wearing a hoodie people think he’s the next Mark Zuckerberg.’”

Jones mentioned something about racism to which Prince replied: “No, it’s because we haven’t produced any Mark Zuckerbergs yet.”

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"Diversity brings so much more to the table - and by focusing outside of the usual and rewarding all sorts of people in tech - we can only make it better. #YesWeCode is doing exactly that."
- Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple

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